Parents Checklist

  • Be optimistic and open minded.
  • Don’t feel shame or embarrassment.
  • Be encouraging and supportive.
  • Seek independent evaluation in necessary.
  • Become familiar with the disability. Ask questions and seek information.
  • Be willing to work with the teachers.
  • Share your reading material with the teacher.
  • Don’t do your child’s homework for them, rather with them.
  • Request yearly re-evaluation to measure where growth is realized.
  • Disclosure – follow good judgment (piano teacher, soccer/hockey coach, art instructor, etc.)
  • Be your child’s advocate until they can take on the challenge themselves.
  • Kid check – ask your child what is working for them and what’s not.
  • Be patient – remember children instinctively want to do well.
  • Make sure your child has an activity they enjoy and are successful at. (Skateboarding, baking, music, biking, sports, dance, art, etc.)

Source: Randeah Robertson, LDAS, Past President

Suggestions for Parents/Students/Professionals

  • Get to know the up coming teacher. Encourage educators to read your child’s cumulative file. Schedule a conference with the Resource teacher/private tutor/future teacher.
  • Share strategies that were implemented and are currently working.
  • Ask for the list of mandatory reading material and inquire about upcoming lessons and vocabulary.
  • Investigate if the books are available on tape or in large print.
  • Record books, texts, etc., on a tape recorder, marking each new Chapter.
  • Acquire a “talking book” library card.
  • Ask for talking book catalogues no longer in circulation for home use.
  • Buy pencil grips and stay away from coil bound notebooks.
  • Use coloured hi-lighters and recipe cards.
  • Purchase a good spell check.
  • Weekly check-in with the teacher.
  • Seek out a private tutor
  • Encourage the use of graph paper for math work.
  • Use tactile methods to practice confusing letters.
  • Penmanship can be practiced using large colourful markers for a change.
  • Extra time for exams may be needed (a test is a measurement of the child’s knowledge of the material – period – not whether or not they can do it in the allotted time).
  • Ask for oral examinations where necessary.
  • Ask to answer exam questions on a tape recorder instead of writing them out.

Source: Randeah Robertson, LDAS, Past President